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Conservation and Inspiration in the Tennessee River Basin

Conservation and Inspiration in the Tennessee River Basin

An article from the Tennessee River Basin Network's third annual meeting, highlighting the work being done in one of America's most biologically diverse watersheds.

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New Handouts Summarize Tree Species Responses to Climate Change

New Handouts Summarize Tree Species Responses to Climate Change

NIACS created a series of 2-page handouts that summarize how individual tree species are expected to respond to climate change across the Northeast based on regional climate change vulnerability assessments. Each handout includes model projections based on future climate scenarios and models like the Climate Change Tree Atlas. We think they're a handy way to show a lot of information and get people thinking about managing climate change risk and opportunity. Handouts are available for subregions within each of the three project areas: New England and Northern New York Mid-Atlantic Central Appalachians

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Adaptive Silviculture for Climate Change Project Now Underway

A new study is underway in New Hampshire's northwoods that will further our understanding of management options for climate change adaptation. The Adaptive Silviculture for Climate Change (ASCC) project is a collaborative effort among scientists and land managers to develop a network of experimental silvicultural trials in different forest ecosystem types throughout the United States, and the Second College Grant, located in the Northern Forest region of New Hampshire and owned and managed by Dartmouth College, is one of five ASCC study sites. The project was initiated last fall and launched into full-force this spring with pre-treatment data collection. Timber harvests began this summer to implement forest management treatments demonstrating the three adaptation options of resistance, resilience, and transition. Scientists and managers will be planting tree species that have been identified as future-adapted for the transition treatment next spring, which includes northern red oak, bitternut hickory, eastern white pine, eastern hemlock, basswood, black birch, bigtooth aspen, and chestnut. To learn more about the Second College Grant ASCC project, contact the Site Leads Tony D'Amato or Chris Woodall.

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American Fisheries Society Newsletter

The AFS recently put out their newsletter for the month of October. See what the headlines are over at the American Fisheries Society...

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Recovery: Farm Bill Provides Hope for the Cerulean Warbler

Recovery: Farm Bill Provides Hope for the Cerulean Warbler

With funding from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) available from the Farm Bill’s Regional Conservation Partnership Program the Appalachian Mountains Joint Venture (a partnership of state and federal agencies and NGOs including The Nature Conservancy) is helping private land owners restore cerulean habitat. Check out the original article at the Nature Conservancy's Cool Green Science blog: https://blog.nature.org/science/2017/08/15/recovery-farm-bill-provides-hope-for-the-cerulean-warbler/

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region Updates Federal Endangered Species Act

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region has recently published their quarterly update to the Federal Endangered Species Act. ESA Update #22 includes recovery planning and implementation methods, new Habitat Conservation Plans, information on reclassification, and other changes to the ESA.

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New Article on the Influence of Arsenic and Sulfate on Freshwater Mussel Gene Expression

Results of the work on gene expression in mussels exposed to coal-related toxic substances has reached the literature.

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The Soft Things - article from Oxford American

Find here a beautiful article on freshwater mussels written by Holly Haworth

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Northeast States Release Report on Hellbender Distribution

Northeast States Release Report on Hellbender Distribution

The Regional Conservation Needs (RCN) Grants Program funded project, Developing a coordinated research approach for hellbender conservation in the northeast, was completed in late 2016. The goals of the project were to better document hellbender distribution in the Northeast using environmental DNA (eDNA) surveys and to develop a communication framework and standardized methodologies to coordinate conservation efforts throughout the region. The final report as well as eDNA and egg rearing protocol are now available on the RCN project page.

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“Report Card” to Assess Current Conditions, Ecological Health of Natural Resources in Tennessee River Basin

“Report Card” to Assess Current Conditions, Ecological Health of Natural Resources in Tennessee River Basin

The Appalachian LCC is supporting researchers from the University of Maryland in developing an assessment of ecological health, or a “Report Card”, for the Tennessee River Basin.

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Workshops Introduce New Way to Evaluate Changes to Benefits of Nature

Workshops Introduce New Way to Evaluate Changes to Benefits of Nature

The Appalachian LCC and the U.S. Forest Service held its initial workshops introducing a new way of evaluating ecosystem change and resilience via the Landscape Dynamics Assessment Tool (LanDAT).

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Integrating Cultural Resources into Regional Conservation Planning

Integrating Cultural Resources into Regional Conservation Planning

A collaborative research project sponsored by the Appalachian LCC, the National Park Service, and Penn State University (PSU) is integrating cultural resources, such as historic bridges and Civil War Battlefields, into landscape conservation planning and design.

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Land Trusts are Vital Links for Regional Conservation Planning and Management

Land Trusts are Vital Links for Regional Conservation Planning and Management

On April 24, Executive Director Rick Huffines of the Tennessee River Gorge Trust spearheaded a workshop among his network of partners focused on Appalachian LCC science and tools to enhance planning and management in the Gorge.

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New Conservation Fellow Joins LCC Team

Our second Conservation Fellow, Dr. Madeline (Maddie) Brown, will be coming on board in the summer of 2017 and stationed at Penn State University under the direction of Dr. Tim Murtha and jointly supported by the Appalachian LCC and National Park Service.

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Appalachian Conservation Heroes Retiring

This year we say goodbye to a number of individuals who were instrumental in the development and growth of landscape conservation in the Appalachians.

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Saying Goodbye to a Central Component of the LCC Team: Communications Coordinator Moves onto New Opportunity at University of South Florida, St. Petersburg

Saying Goodbye to a Central Component of the LCC Team: Communications Coordinator Moves onto New Opportunity at University of South Florida, St. Petersburg

Appalachian LCC Communications Coordinator Matthew Cimitile will be departing the LCC team after five years for a job opportunity with the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg as their communications and marketing manager/officer.

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Ohio River Basin Fish Habitat Partnership FY 2018 Call for Project Proposals

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) anticipates receiving appropriations in FY 2018 to support the Ohio River Basin Fish Habitat Partnership (ORBFHP) and its efforts to complete on-the-ground, aquatic habitat protection, restoration, and enhancement projects.

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Appalachian LCC Integrating Cultural Resources Research Webinar

Presentation by Dr. Tim Murtha of Penn State University on a collaborative research project sponsored by the National Park Service and the Appalachian LCC, which seeks to integrate cultural resources, such as historic bridges and Civil War Battlefields, into landscape conservation planning and design to emphasize both natural and cultural resources in defining conservation priorities.

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