Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
Personal tools
You are here: Home Cooperative Publications & Outreach AppLCC Fact Sheets

AppLCC Fact Sheet Collection

Fact Sheet: AppLCC Overview

Fact Sheet: AppLCC Overview

Today a range of monumental conservation challenges confronts the Appalachians. This includes the loss and fragmentation of natural habitats; disruptions in natural disturbance regimes; and expanding major land-use changes that are occurring on a grand scale. Climate change will further exacerbate these challenges. The magnitude of these landscape-level changes requires a shift from traditional local and single-species conservation approaches toward a more comprehensive scale to protect species, habitats, and ecosystems. The Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) serves as a catalyst for conservation collaboration by providing the tools, products, and data, resource managers and partners need to address the environmental threats that are beyond the scope of any one agency.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Assessing Future Energy

Fact Sheet: Assessing Future Energy

Assessing Future Energy Development Across the Appalachian Region

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Assessing Vulnerability of Species and Habitats to Large-scale Impacts

Fact Sheet: Assessing Vulnerability of Species and Habitats to Large-scale Impacts

New vulnerability assessments for 41 species and 3 habitats in the Appalachians.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Cave and Karst Resources

Fact Sheet: Cave and Karst Resources

Addressing knowledge gaps to better protect unique landforms and their wealth of hidden biodiversity.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Ecosystem Benefits and Risks

Fact Sheet: Ecosystem Benefits and Risks

Fact Sheet: Ecosystem Benefits and Risks

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Habitat - Forest/Woodlands

Fact Sheet: Habitat - Forest/Woodlands

Forest/Woodland habitats describe large areas primarily dominated by trees, with moderate ground coverage, such as grasses and shrubs. Density, tree height, and land use may all vary, though woodland is typically used to describe lower density forests. A forest may have an open canopy, but a woodland must have an open canopy with enough sunlight to reach the ground and limited shade.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Habitat - Forested Stream and/or Seepage

Fact Sheet: Habitat - Forested Stream and/or Seepage

Forested stream environments are typically found in the buffer zones between forested land and stream banks, often known as riparian zones. Stream headwaters and seepage areas occur where ground water percolates to the surface through muck, mossy rock, and nettles. It can also be found under rocks, among gravel, or cobble where water has begun to percolate in areas near open water. Breeding grounds are commonly found beneath mosses growing on rocks, on logs, or soil surfaces in these types of seepage areas.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Habitat - Meadows and Marshlands

Fact Sheet: Habitat - Meadows and Marshlands

Meadows are open grasslands where grass and other non-woody plants are the primary vegetation. With no tree coverage, meadows are typically open, sunny areas that attract flora and fauna that require both ample space and sunlight. These conditions allow for the growth of many wildflowers and are typically important ecosystems for pollinating insects. Marshlands are like meadows in that they typically have no tree coverage and host primarily grasses and woody plants. However, a defining characteristic of marshlands is their wetland features.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Habitat - Open Woodlands

Fact Sheet: Habitat - Open Woodlands

Used generally to describe low density forests, open woodland ecosystems contain widely spaced trees whose crowns do not touch, causing for an open canopy, insignificant midstory canopy layer, sparse understory and where groundcover is the most obvious feature of the landscape dominated by diverse flora (grasses, forbes, sedges). Open Woodlands provide habitat for a diverse mix of wildlife species, several of which are of conservation concern, such as Red Headed Woodpecker, Prairie Warbler, Kentucky Warbler, Northern Bobwhite and Eastern Red Bat.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Landscape Dynamics Assessment Tool (LanDAT)

Fact Sheet: Landscape Dynamics Assessment Tool (LanDAT)

LanDAT delivers monitoring information in a way that helps users interpret landscape-change and resilience

Read More…

Fact Sheet: NatureScape

Fact Sheet: NatureScape

Landscape Conservation Design and On-Line Conservation Planning Tool

Read More…

Fact Sheet: NatureScape FAQ

Fact Sheet: NatureScape FAQ

Frequently asked questions about NatureScape

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Riparian Restoration Decision Support Tool

Fact Sheet: Riparian Restoration Decision Support Tool

An innovative web-based tool - funded by the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and developed by researchers from the U.S. Forest Service and the University of Massachusetts - is allowing managers to rapidly identify high-priority riparian targets for restoration to make more resilient in preparation for changes in future climate. The Riparian Restoration Prioritization to Promote Climate Change Resilience (RPCCR) tool identifies vulnerable stream and riverbanks that lack tree cover and shade in coldwater stream habitats. By locating the best spots to plant trees in riparian zones, resource managers can provide shade that limits the amount of solar radiation heating the water and reduces the impacts from climate change. This well-established management strategy will benefit high-elevation, cold-water aquatic communities.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Science Investments

Fact Sheet: Science Investments

Our work and achievements in 2016 and 2017 built upon the collaborative scientific foundation established in our earlier years, while continuing towards a vision of maintaining a landscape that supports the special biological and cultural resources of the Appalachians.  It’s helpful to reflect on the systematic advances made by our regional partnership in terms of its actions, decisions, and our investments—both in terms of the science but also in terms of strengthening the partnership through investment in shared resources.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Stream Impacts

Fact Sheet: Stream Impacts

Assessing current and future water withdrawal scenarios to inform decisions for achieving sustainable water ows that meet human demands and sustain healthy ecosystems.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: Tennessee River Basin Network

Fact Sheet: Tennessee River Basin Network

The Tennessee River winds its way for roughly 650 miles through Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, and back into Tennessee, before reaching Kentucky where it empties into the Ohio River. In total the Basin encompasses over 40,000 square miles, covering five major physiographic provinces: the Blue Ridge, the Valley and Ridge, the Appalachian Plateau, the Interior Low Plateaus, and the Coastal Plain. The extent of the Basin’s reach vast diversity of geography and geology in the region help to explain why the area harbors one of the most biologically diverse freshwater ecosystems in the world.

Read More…

Fact Sheet: The Web Portal

Fact Sheet: The Web Portal

APPLCC WEB PORTAL OVERVIEW: Empowering Partners to Deliver Conservation and Connect Landscapes

Read More…

Back to Top